Bao-zi

A recipe from Steamy Kitchen but this recipe comes from Magic Ingredients YouTube

“Baozi (Chinese: 包子), or bao, is a type of filled bun or bread-like (i.e. made with yeast) dumpling in various Chinese cuisines.” ~Wikipedia

Ingredients:

  • all-purpose flour 400g little bit more than 2.5 cups
  • 160 °F – warm water 250g ( 1 cup)
  • water 250g 1 cup
  • Sichuan peppercorns 1g 1/2 teaspoon
  • star anise 1g
  • big green onions 200g – 3 of them
  • salt 6g = 3/4 teaspoon
  • ground pork 500g
  • Sichuan peppercorn powder 1g = 1/2 teaspoon
  • white pepper powder less than 1g = 1/4 teaspoon
  • 1 egg white

Directions:

  1. Dough – Mix all purpose flour and warm water, knead for 3 minutes then cover let it rest for 20 minutes, then knead it again so it looks smooth … let it rest for an hour.
  2. Filling – I boil a small pot of water on the stove then put the first 3 ingredients in the pot, cook for 15 minutes, after it cools off then pour in a big bowl with pork in it, add salt, pepper, egg, stir in a circular direction one way only …. after 5 minutes then add chopped green onions …. difficult task for me because it’s my first time to make this, I watched Youtube so I learned how to shape them like a pro, mine doesn’t look professional but not too ugly I think.

Recipe was for soup dumplings (xiao long bao), but I did not want to make soup (as it takes more work and time). I used ground pork. The hard part was that this was my first time making this recipe. They are not pretty like what is sold in stores, but once I practice a few more times, then they will be better probably. I only used half of her recipe, because it was my first time and I did not want to waste flour if I messed up. I used a non-bleached flour, therefore it was not as white as what is sold in stores. I need to learn more about kneading dough, because she made it look so easy, I think she has a lot of experience…
~Kai-ling

Glühwein

Simmering!

According to Austria.info

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 medium orange
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1/4 cup turbinado or granulated sugar
  • 20 whole cloves
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 2 whole star anise
  • 1 (750-milliliter) bottle dry red wine
  • Rum (optional)

Directions:

  1. Stick the cloves into the orange. Put all ingredients in a pot and bring it close to boil. DO NOT BOIL.
  2. For additional taste cut 2 oranges in to bite size pieces and add to the wine.
  3. Let simmer.
  4. Remove clove, cinnamon stick before serving it into lightly pre-warmed glasses.
  5. Decorate glasses with a slice of orange.
  6. Enjoy and drink responsibly.

Four years in Germany means certain traditions you miss that they just do better. Weihnachts is one, Fastnacht is another. NYC tries to have a Weihnachtsmarkt that recollects the experience, but it’s only a pale shadow reminiscent of it. “Gluhwein” translates to “glow wine”, as I understand it. The three main types of drink I would have in Konstanz:

Glühwein is usually prepared from red wine, heated and spiced with cinnamon sticks, cloves, star anise, citrus, sugar and at times vanilla pods. For children, the non-alcoholic Kinderpunsch is offered on Christmas markets, which is a Punch with similar spices. Another popular variant of Glühwein in Germany is the Feuerzangenbowle. It shares the same recipe, but for this drink a rum-soaked sugarloaf is set on fire and allowed to drip into the wine.” (Wiki)

~Jessica