Taiwanese sticky rice

aka “Oily Rice” (油飯). Adapted from an Intercollegiate Taiwanese American Students Association (ITASA) cooking workshop recipe hosted by the National Alliance of Taiwan Women’s Associations (NATWA)

2 cups long-grain sweet rice (I used 3 rice-cooker-cups glutinous rice)
5 dried black mushrooms (if you haven’t, shiitake)
10 slices ginger (I only used 5)
100-200 g boneless pork (I used 4 Chinese sausages)
75 mL sesame oil
300 mL hot water
60 mL soy sauce

Pre-cooking preparation:
a. Place the rice in a large bowl and rinse thoroughly. Cover with water and soak for at least 4 hours, or even overnight. Drain.
b. Soak dried mushrooms in hot water for 10 minutes or until soft. Wash mushrooms thoroughly and slice thin.
c. Crush ginger slices with a rolling pin to release the flavor.
d. Slice pork thin.

IMAG5663Heat sesame oil in wok. Brown the crushed ginger. Remove ginger from wok. Brown pork and mushrooms in the remaining sesame oil. Add the rice and soy sauce to wok, mix thoroughly. Here you can either cook it in a rice cooker (less water than covers the rice) or: Add 1/2 cup of hot water to the wok. Cover and cook on high for 2 minutes. Stir and add the remaining hot water. Keep stirring until the rice becomes translucent. Cover wok and cook on low heat for 10 more minutes. Serve.

~Jessica

P.S. I added some extras suggested by It’s My Dish and The Grub Files: cane sugar, 2 star anise (~16 points), 1-2 fried shallots, 3 cloves garlic (lightly smashed), dried shrimp (soaked 30 minutes in warm water), Shaoxing rice wine, oyster sauce, boiled peanuts, five spice powder.

Chinese wonton soup

Here’s a recipe not quite similar to the dumplings we did for Lunar New Year. Adapted from LMU München and The Woks of Life. Serves 4

300 g ground pork
200 g bok choy (I used Napa cabbage)
5 scallions, sliced thin
1 slice of ginger, finely grated
15 mL light soy sauce
3 g sesame oil
2 splashes of shaoxing wine
tiny bit of sugar
ground white pepper
500 g wonton wrappers (mine was frozen)
a bit of cornstarch
1.5 L+ of chicken ginger stock (I used legume-vegetable, not as good!)

Mix scallions with the pork, salt, soy sauce and sesame oil. Stir the mixture for a minute. Put teaspoon of filling in the center of the wrapper (“less is more” or they might burst), moisten edges with a little cornstarch slurry (1 part cornstarch : 2 parts water). Fold into a rectangle, sealing all the edges. Or you can fold it into a flower bud or nun’s cap.

Boil the stock, add wontons slowly, and stir occasionally so they don’t stick. After all the wontons float to the surface, cook an extra minute. Drain and serve in a hot chicken broth. Top with chopped cilantro and season with white pepper and sesame oil, if you like. I like to add bok choy, although it wasn’t in season so I only had a bit of Napa cabbage this time, a là Woks of Life’s simplified recipe.

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Steamed shaomai for appetizers!

shāomài (燒賣) is a type of traditional Chinese dumpling served as dim sum.

~Jessica

Chinese grilled pork chops

Adapted from No Special Effects and smitten kitchen.

Ingredients:

  • Marinade for 4 bone-in pork chops (~ 1 kg total)
  • rice wine/dry sherry
  • soy sauce
  • sesame oil
  • honey
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced and mashed to a paste with 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • ginger
  • oyster sauce
  • salt + pepper, Five-spice powder (Star anise (八角), Cloves (丁香), Cinnamon (肉桂), Sichuan pepper (花椒), Fennel seeds (小茴香))
  • scallions
  • cornstarch
  • Hoisin sauce (optional)
  • Sriracha (optional)

Directions:

How to marinate

  1. In a nonreactive dish (glass, ceramic, plastic, stainless steel), mix: ACID + SALT OIL + HERBS/SEASONINGS/SUGAR + TIME
  2. wine + soy sauce + sesame oil + garlic, ginger, honey, chili pepper flakes, scallions, etc.
  3. Marinate pork for 4-12 hours! (30 minutes minimum)

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Perfect for the barbecue! I like using cornstarch; it’s a classic ingredient for Chinese marinades that keeps the meat juicy. Also featured in the pics: garlic butter roasted mushrooms and crispy potatoes.

~Jessica