Frittata di pasta

Adapted from Leite’s Culinaria and Gennaro Contaldo

Ingredients:

  • Pasta leftovers
  • 4 eggs
  • 40 g Parmesan cheese
  • salt and pepper
  • olive oil

Directions:

  1. Crack the eggs into a bowl and whisk very well, until streaks no longer appear. Mix in the cheese, oil, salt, and a grind of pepper.
  2. If you have sauced spaghetti, dump it in a large nonstick or well-seasoned cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat along with a couple tablespoons water and heat until it’s warm but before it starts to sizzle.
  3. Drain off any water that hasn’t evaporated and turn the spaghetti into the egg mixture.
  4. Wipe out the skillet, return it to medium-low heat, and add enough oil or butter to slick the bottom and sides of the skillet.
  5. Add the egg mixture, distributing the spaghetti evenly if it clumps.
  6. Turn the heat to low and occasionally rotate the skillet a quarter turn if the egg seems to be cooking unevenly around the edges. When the perimeter of the frittata looks set and the center is still somewhat liquid, which should be after about 8 minutes, run a table knife around the skillet to loosen the sides of the frittata and carefully slip a thin metal spatula under it to loosen the underside.
  7. Invert a plate over the skillet and place one hand over the plate and the other hand on the skillet handle. Here comes the exciting part—you’re going to flip the frittata onto the plate. (We admit that it can end in disaster, but you have to stay confident and strong.) You don’t want the frittata to slide onto the plate or fold over, so the motion should be up and over, not just over, and it has to happen kind of quickly. Alley-oop, and it’s on the plate and the skillet is clean.
  8. Set the plate down and quickly slick the skillet with a little more oil or butter. Then, with the help of the spatula, encourage the frittata to slide back in. Don’t worry if things are looking a little Humpty Dumpty—just fit it all back together again and keep it over low heat until it’s cooked through, about 7 more minutes.
  9. When the frittata seems to be cooked through, make a crack in the middle with the tip of the spatula and sneak a peek to see that the egg is all set. Then slide or flip the frittata onto a plate.
  10. Let cool a little or a lot, slice in wedges or squares or long skinny strips, and serve. (A frittata tastes good hot, better after it has cooled a half hour or so, and possibly best after it has had a chance to regroup on the countertop for an afternoon.)

I had the leftovers from this other pasta dish, so… I love Gennaro’s suggestion: “If it’s springtime, make the basic recipe extra special by adding peas and pancetta.” Shelling fresh peas in Germany was such a dream. I wish we had in season produce like in Radolfzell. Next time I will use more eggs, so that it holds together better!

~Jessica

Taiwanese fried rice

Adapted from Michelle Ferng and Farm to Table Baby Mama

Ingredients:

  • 6 cups cooked white rice, cooled overnight in fridge
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 cup Chinese sausage / bacon, cooked and finely chopped (can sub with mushrooms, quartered)
  • 1 large garlic, finely minced
  • 1/2 cup carrots, roughly chopped or diced
  • 1/2 cup frozen peas
  • other vegetables (corn, chopped lettuce, spinach, etc.)
  • 4 stalks scallions (about 10 shoots total), chopped into 1/8″ segments
  • vegetable oil
  • sesame oil
  • soy sauce
  • rice or sherry wine (optional)
  • white pepper (optional)
  • salt

Directions:

  1. Heat up skillet over high heat. Add a drizzle of grape-seed oil or other neutral vegetable oil.
  2. Add garlic and then white and light green scallions to infuse the oil. Slightly sauté until the garlic turns golden.
  3. Once oil is ready, add the cooked rice and use a spoon or rice paddle to break up the rice and mix with the garlic and scallions. Add the salt and pepper. Mix.
  4. Fold in the veggies and dark green scallions.
  5. Pour the eggs over the rice and continue to mix until the egg and mixture is dry. Taste and top with extra slices of veggies.
  6. Serve hot

Fried rice (蛋炒飯, dàn chǎofàn) is an amazing standby, the perfect comfort food. I had spinach, and I garnished with just a bit of kimchi for some zing. With the pandemic shelter-in, I’m developing a fondness for eating preserved vegetables at my own pace (getting too many vegetables usually means some portion of rot before I can finish it on my own).

~Jessica

Risi e bisi

IMG_20180804_180040.jpgAdapted from NYTimes and Simply Recipes

Ingredients:

  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, diced fine (or 3 shallots, if you have them)
  • 1/2 carrot, minced
  • 2 cups arborio (or carnaroli) rice
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • 1.5 boxes of hot chicken broth
  • some pancetta, diced (we used cooked pulled pork)
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, sliced thinly
  • shucked English peas, about 1-2 cups
  • 1/2 red bell pepper
  • 2-3 brown mushrooms (porcini preferable)
  • pea tendrils or shoots (or use baby spinach) — didn’t use but sounds fab
  • chopped parsley
  • grated Parmesan

Directions:

  1. Melt butter in a heavy, wide saucepan over medium high heat. Add onion and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Or cook at lower heat for longer time.
  2. Stir in rice and season with salt and pepper. Continue cooking for 2 minutes, until translucent. Add the minced carrot and sliced garlic.
  3. Add the white wine, stirring, until it evaporates.
  4. Add 2 ladles of hot chicken broth (simmering in a separate pot, you can also dilute by rinsing the container with water) and bring to a brisk simmer. Cook 6 minutes, stirring regularly as broth is absorbed. Add 2 more ladles of broth and cook for another 6 minutes, until rice is cooked through, but firm. Every time all of the liquid is absorbed, add more stock — do not let dry out!
  5. Add pancetta (or prosciutto or pork of your choice) and cook 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Add minced bell pepper, stir to coat and cook 1 minute. When you get to this last cup of water, add the peas and chopped mushrooms. Season generously with salt and pepper. Add 1/2 cup broth and simmer until peas are done, about 2 minutes. Add pea tendrils and cook until just wilted, about 1 minute.
  6. if the rice is still crunchy, don’t stop – you want the rice to be a little al dente, but not so much you’re gnawing on raw grain.
  7. Mix pea mixture with rice mixture and gently stir together. Add enough broth to keep rice a bit soupy. Check seasoning. Stir in parsley, lemon zest and Parmesan.
  8. Serve immediately.

Visiting family, wanted to use up the arborio rice I found in the back of their cupboard. They also had bought chicken stock in bulk so…

~Jessica

Rigatoni carbonara

IMG_2667Amber’s recipe, learned in a cooking class on her Phillippines-Vietnam trip

Ingredients:
400 g pasta of your choice
2 eggs
75 g Parmigiano-Reggiano (aged three years), grated
3-4 strips of bacon (if only we had guanciale or pancetta!)
black pepper
100 g peas, frozen
2-3 cloves of garlic

Directions:
Bring a pot of salted water to boil, while you do other things. Fry the bacon until crisp but not too overdone. Beat the eggs, and mix in the cheese. Season this with some salt and pepper. Mince the garlic. Saute the garlic until fragrant. Add the peas to cook them a little bit, or cook them in the pasta pot of boiling water for one minute like Jamie suggests.

When pasta is al dente, drain and make sure you reserve some pasta water (we did not, sadly). Toss the pasta, peas, and bacon all together in your pan. Season with fresh cracked pepper if you have a grinder. Now, make sure the pan isn’t too hot, or the eggs will scramble. Slowly add the cheese-egg mixture so the heat of the pasta cooks it, tossing all the while. Jamie also suggests adding pasta water to thin the sauce if need be. Garnish with some more freshly grated Parmigiano and slivered basil (we took a few leaves from the window herb “garden”).

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I love fettuccine or linguine (pasta lunga) best, but we only had pasta corta (short pasta) in the cupboard. Amber had a hankering for this as we had all the ingredients and had been eating my grandmother’s cooking for several meals by now (food is equal to love, for Chinese families — accept the gifts of food and be grateful).

~Jessica

Pi Day Special – Shepherd’s Pie

3/14, that most special of days! For those who aren’t quite as nerdy, it’s Pi Day, celebrating π, that mathematical constant usually used for calculating areas and volumes of circles – 3.1415926535… Okay, fine, it’s basically just an excuse to celebrate pies in all shapes and forms! So in honor of this day, I’m crashing Jessie’s blog to share a recipe that I prepared myself for Pi Day!

Since we are in the middle of Winter Storm Stella (STELLLLAAAA!) here in New York, I thought rather than a sweet or dessert pie I’d prefer something a little more hearty, to get me revved up for all the snow removal we would be doing later on. Shepherd’s pie, with its fluffy mashed potatoes atop savory ground beef filling, was the perfect solution.

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Shepherd’s Pie

Adapted from allrecipes

Ingredients

  • 4 large potatoes, cubed and peeled
  • 1 tablespoon butter (alright… I used 1.5, cuz more butter makes mashed potatoes so good!)
  • 1/4 cup shredded cheese (I used provolone, which I had on hand)
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 3 stalks celery, chopped
  • 2 cups frozen mixed vegetables (peas, corn, carrots, beans mix)
  • 1 lb lean ground beef
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1 tablespoon ketchup
  • 1 cup beef broth
  • Melted butter to brush on top of mashed potatoes

Directions

  1. Bring a pot of salted water to boil and add the potatoes. Cook until tender and easily pierced by fork, around 15 minutes. Drain in colander and mash in large bowl with butter and shredded cheese until smooth. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.
  2. Heat oil in a large frying pan. Add onion and cook until starting to turn transparent, around 3 minutes. Add celery and continue cooking for 3 more minutes. Add mixed vegetables and cook 5 more minutes. I cooked until the water from the frozen vegetables had evaporated. Set aside vegetables and clean pan.
  3. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. In the clean frying pan, add a small amount of oil. Add ground beef and brown, around 8-10 minutes. Drain of excess fat and reintroduce the vegetable mixture. Stir in flour and cook for 1 minute.
  4. Add ketchup and beef broth. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes.
  5. Spread the ground beef mixture in an even layer in a 2 quart casserole dish. Top with mashed potatoes and spread in an even layer. Brush melted butter on top of mashed potatoes.
  6. Bake in the preheated oven for 20 minutes. If the potatoes aren’t golden brown, you can put them under the broiler for 5 minutes or until they are browned, I like to watch it to make sure it doesn’t get burnt!
  7. Enjoy the delicious fruits of your labor! I hope you enjoyed this recipe, and if you would like to visit my blog please feel free (shameless plug over).

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a messy plate of shepherd’s pie, living life on the edge… of the table.

~Peggy

Garlic pea shoots

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Dau Miu / dòu miáo (豆苗)
Adapted from steamy kitchen

1/2 lb. pea shoots
vegetable (peanut?) oil
2 cloves of garlic
rice wine
sesame oil

Saute garlic in vegetable oil until fragrant on medium-low heat in a wok. Stir-fry pea shoots until barely wilted. Remove from heat. Season with wine and sesame oil to taste.

~Jessica

Chinese fried rice

Adapted from Rasa Malaysia and China on Site and steamy kitchen.

~1 lap cheong (Chinese sausage), diced small
180 g baby shrimp
200 g  frozen peas-corn-carrot, defrosted 15 min (I had 300 g)
2 stalks of scallions, sliced thin
2 garlic cloves, minced
fresh ginger, grated
3-4 cups Jasmine rice, leftover
4 glugs of peanut oil
2 eggs, beaten
pinch of black/white pepper
fish sauce
soy sauce
sesame oil
splash of cooking wine
1 skinless and boneless chicken breast (optional)
100 g salted fish (optional)

IMAG5303

plated

Heat oil in wok. Fry Chinese sausage and shrimps over low heat until done. Remove from heat. Stir-fry frozen veggies until done. Set aside. Heat oil in wok. Quickly stir-fry scallions, garlic, and ginger until fragrant. Add back the sausage and vegetables. Stir-fry quickly. Scramble eggs separately and add. Add rice; stir to mix. Add in soy sauce, fish sauce, wine, and white pepper, stirring. Remove from heat. Sprinkle with scallions and (toasted) sesame oil. Serve.

~Jessica

P.S. My mom’s version:

fried-rice

Mom’s chicken fried rice

Just photos. SO yum.

~Jessica

Matar paneer

Adapted from Spice Up The Curry and Edible Garden

Ingredients:

400 g green peas, boiled 2-3 min (I used frozen)
175 g paneer, cubed (I used smoked tofu instead)
1 lemon
ghee (if you have it, otherwise I used butter)
2 large onions
2.5 cm ginger, grated
1 garlic, minced
chopped, ripe tomatoes
2 small green chilies, chopped

Spices
1 pinch of kasuri methi (dried fenugreek leaves) — I didn’t have
garam masala, cumin, turmeric, red chili, coriander
salt to taste

Garnish
1 spoonful of cream
cilantro
50 g Cashews, soaked in water for 30 min.

Directions:

  1. Fry any spices (that you have whole) and chilis in oil/butter. Saute onion, ginger, garlic until fragrant. Season with salt.
  2. Add tomatoes. Add your powdered spices now and cook until the liquid evaporates.
  3. Grind soaked cashews into a paste with some water.
  4. Fry the paneer separately, then add this to the sauce with the peas and cashew paste.
  5. Add the cream and cilantro.
  6. Serve hot.

Smoked tofu is extra-firm and ideally smoked in tea leaves, but I don’t taste it much. Very similar to dry tofu, but lighter in flavor. Serving suggestions: Mater paneer masala can be served with roti, paratha, or naan; if served with plain rice, thin the sauce.

~Jessica