Murgh makhani (Indian butter chicken)

Adapted from Little Spice Jar and Urvashi Pitre

Chicken Marinade Ingredients:

  • 1 (14-ounce) can diced tomatoes (we used tomatoes on the vine)
  • 5 or 6 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon minced ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon ground paprika
  • 2 teaspoons garam masala, divided
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken (breasts or thighs)
  • 4 ounces butter, cut into cubes, or ½ cup coconut oil
  • ½ cup yogurt (original: full-fat coconut milk)
  • ¼ to ½ cup chopped fresh cilantro

Directions:

  1. In a medium bowl, combine the tandoori masala, ginger, garlic, and yogurt. Whisk until smooth, adjust seasonings to preference. Add the chicken and allow to marinate for at least 20 minutes and ideally for 12-24 hours, covered in the refrigerator. We marinated overnight.
  2. Heat the ghee (we used butter) in a heavy bottom pot over medium heat. Add the onions and sauté until they turn translucent and start to sweat, about 5-7 minutes — don’t allow the onions to brown! Add ginger and garlic paste and let cook for 30 seconds, stirring so it doesn’t burn. Add the crushed tomatoes along with the chili powder, coriander powder, and cumin powder and continue to cook for 5 minutes, if the mixture starts bubbling rapidly, add about ¼ cup of water and continue to cook.
  3. Heat the remaining tablespoon of oil in the dutch oven over medium heat. Add the marinated chicken (discard any excess marinade) and cook for about 5-6 minutes, stirring as required to brown all sides.
  4. Add the butter chicken sauce to the pot and heat everything through. Once it starts to bubble, add the cream (we used whole plain yogurt) and garam masala. When the sauce regains a simmer, add the crushed fenugreek leaves (we didn’t have! Darn COVID-19 pandemic). Serve over basmati rice or with naan.

(Hindi: मुर्ग़ मक्खनी) according to Wiki. “The subtle difference between Paneer Butter Masala and Shahi paneer is that more of whole spices are used in Paneer Butter Masala whereas Shahi paneer has a sweeter taste when compared to Paneer Butter Masala.” (Wiki) Pitre’s recipe was even featured in The New Yorker! Jesse cooked this really well, and even set timers and things. We did not have an Instant Pot.

~Jessica

Falafel with tzatziki sauce

Adapted from The Moosewood Cookbook and The Mediterranean Dish

Ingredients (falafel):

  • 2 (15 ounce) cans chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • 12 cup onion, minced
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 2 teaspoons cumin (can use a bit more if you like)
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 dashes cayenne pepper
  • 14 cup fresh parsley, chopped and packed
  • 14 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 13 cup flour
  • oil, for pan frying (we used canola oil)

Ingredients (tzatziki):

  • 3/4 English cucumber, partially peeled (striped) and sliced
  • 3/4 tsp kosher salt, divided
  • 4 – 5 garlic cloves, peeled, finely grated or minced (you can use less if you prefer)
  • 1/2 tsp white vinegar
  • 1 tbsp Arlotta garlic infused Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1 cup Greek yogurt (I used organic fat free Greek yogurt, but you can use 2% or whole milk Greek yogurt, if you like)
  • 1/4 tsp ground white pepper

Directions:

  1. Place all ingredients except flour in a large mixing bowl. Hulk smash.
  2. Thoroughly mix flour into the falafel batter with a spoon.
  3. Warm pita bread for serving. Sliced vegetables for serving.

Jesse got the idea for this based on the Moosewood recipe — imagine my surprise when I discovered it’s the same Moosewood as the restaurant in Ithaca, NY!

-Jessica

Korean kimchi

Adapted from Sara Moulton

Ingredients:

  • 1 small head napa cabbage (about 1 pound)
  • 1/3 cup kosher salt
  • 1/3 cup unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 1 Tbs sugar
  • 1 tsp sweet or hot paprika
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 medium red bell pepper
  • 3 medium scallions
  • One 3-inch piece of fresh ginger
  • 1 garlic clove

Directions:

  1. Trim off the core end of the cabbage. Split each leaf lengthwise and cut it crosswise into 1 1/2 inch ribbons (about 4 cups). Combine the cabbage and salt in a nonreactive bowl and set aside at room temperature for 2 hours.
  2. Bring the vinegar, sugar, paprika, and cayenne to a boil over high heat in a small saucepan.
  3. Meanwhile, finely chop the bell pepper (about 1/2 cup) and transfer it to a medium bowl. Trim and thinly slice the scallions (a heaping 1/3 cup) and peel and Microplane-grate the ginger (about 1 tablespoon); transfer each to the bowl with the bell pepper as it is prepared. Press the garlic (about 1 teaspoon) into the bowl.
  4. Drain, rinse, and thoroughly dry the cabbage; add it to the bell pepper mixture along with the vinegar mixture and stir until thoroughly combined. Pack the kimchi into a nonreactive bowl or jar, cover, refrigerate until you are ready to use it. Kimchi will keep in the refrigerator for about 1 week.

I use apple cider vinegar in making Korean Kimchi. It’s good — I like all of these pickled veggies, no cooking oil, no fat, just fresh vegetables. I made Kimchi with julienned carrots (as a sub for the red bell pepper). First I salted the Napa cabbage in a big pot and put a heavy plate on it, with added weights on it, so it will sweat more water out of it — for 4 hours or longer is fine. Also I used store-bought Kimchi first: after I finished the jar, then I could used the leftover sour juice for starter, as a shortcut. It came out pretty good! No need to spend big money to buy it packaged every time. I don’t eat Kimchi often, but once a while with my homemade fried rice, it’s a good combination in taste.
~Kai-ling

A side of kimchi with pork fried rice

P.S. Also I have heard that Kimchi and sauerkraut are good fermented foods: “Sauerkraut is essentially fermented cabbage… During the fermentation process, beneficial probiotics, or ‘live bacteria’ are produced, and these probiotics are what give sauerkraut most of its health benefits. Sauerkraut is a good form of dietary fibre and contains vitamins C and K, potassium, calcium and phosphorus.” (BBC Good Food)

Patatas bravas

aka patatas a la brava or papas bravas. Adapted from No Recipes and Felicity Cloake

Aioli
6 cloves garlic, finely grated
1 egg
2 splashes of lemon juice / sherry vinegar
pinch of sea salt
pinch of honey / sugar
olive oil

4 Yukon gold potatoes, chopped (~500 g)
300ml olive oil (or duck fat, if you can get it)
1 small onion, finely chopped
1 red chilli, finely chopped
smoked paprika, cayenne pepper/red pepper flakes/chili
400g tin chopped tomatoes
Chives, chopped, to serve

No Photo! I forgot the chives and overcooked the potatoes!

Bake the potatoes in olive oil for ~45 minutes at 200 deg C. Salt lightly and set aside. Fry onion and chili at medium heat in the fat of your choice until fragrant, then add the tomatoes, spices, and simmer 20 min. Add 1 spoonful of your acid. Taste. Mix with the potatoes. Top with chives.

Whisk garlic with olive oil separately. Mix the egg, 1 spoonful of lemon juice, salt, honey to this. Serve potatoes with a side of the aioli (aka garlic mayonnaise), with chorizo or chistorra.

~Jessica

Bulgur salad with chickpeas, roasted red peppers and cumin

Adapted from smitten kitchen, adapted from A Year in a Vegetarian Kitchen

500 g fine-grain bulgur
700 mL boiling water
3 splashes of fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon honey
1 teaspoon ground cumin
pinch of cayenne pepper
salt
60 mL extra-virgin olive oil
1 can chickpeas, rinsed and drained (400 g)
170 g drained jarred roasted red peppers, diced (I made mine)
170 g quartered cherry tomatoes
1 shallot, finely chopped
fresh parsley leaves, minced
1 medium head Bibb lettuce (I had iceberg)
4 pita breads, warmed and cut into wedges

IMAG5540.jpgAdd boiling water to bulgur. Set aside for 15-20 minutes. Mix lemon juice, honey, cumin, cayenne, salt, and olive oil together. Toss chickpeas, peppers, tomatoes, onion, and parsley with the bulgur to this dressing. Plate this on lettuce leaves inside the pita bread.

~Jessica