Fish tacos with salsa verde

Adapted from My Latina Table and also salsa

Authentic Mexican Salsa Verde Ingredients:

  • 5 Tomatillos
  • 1/4 – 1/2 bunch fresh Cilantro finely chopped
  • 2 Cloves of Garlic
  • 1/4 Onion
  • Jalapenos, 1 (less spicy, could have handled more!)
  • Salt to taste
  • Olive Oil

Salsa Verde Directions:

  1. Slowly saute the tomatillos, the onion, and the jalapenos in a preheated frying pan with some olive oil for 5 minutes.
  2. After 5 minutes, add the garlic cloves and continue cooking until the tomatillos are slightly browned.
  3. Remove from the heat and blend the ingredients with the cilantro and salt in a blender.

Tacos Ingredients:

For the Fish Marinade:

  • 2 pounds of tilapia or other similar fish (we used 3/4 lbs. cod)
  • Juice from 1 lime (lemon)
  • 1 teaspoon of the following: garlic powder black pepper, salt, cumin, onion powder

For the purple cole slow:

  • 1/2 purple cabbage cut into thin slices (green)
  • Chopped Cilantro
  • 1/4 white onion chopped
  • 1/4 cup of olive oil
  • Juice from 1 lime
  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Tacos Directions:

  1. Marinate the tilapia fish with all of the marinade ingredients for at least 25 minutes.
  2. Once fully marinated, place in the center of a large pan, and fry a few minutes on each side, until the meat separates into chunks.
  3. For the Purple Cole Slaw, Combine all of the ingredients in a large bowl, and refrigerate for at least 10 minutes.
  4. For the guacamole, follow this recipe.
  5. To Form the Tacos, Cut the cooked fish into smaller pieces and add to the previously warmed tortillas, followed by the purple cole slaw, the guacamole, Goya black bean soup, sour cream, and the salsa verde.

Breakfast tacos were made for the morning after, but with scrambled eggs instead of fish! The green salsa verde was surprisingly easy and quick! If I were going to redo this recipe, I would (beer) batter the fish next time for some crispy.

~Jessica

Korean kimchi

Adapted from Sara Moulton

Ingredients:

  • 1 small head napa cabbage (about 1 pound)
  • 1/3 cup kosher salt
  • 1/3 cup unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 1 Tbs sugar
  • 1 tsp sweet or hot paprika
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 medium red bell pepper
  • 3 medium scallions
  • One 3-inch piece of fresh ginger
  • 1 garlic clove

Directions:

  1. Trim off the core end of the cabbage. Split each leaf lengthwise and cut it crosswise into 1 1/2 inch ribbons (about 4 cups). Combine the cabbage and salt in a nonreactive bowl and set aside at room temperature for 2 hours.
  2. Bring the vinegar, sugar, paprika, and cayenne to a boil over high heat in a small saucepan.
  3. Meanwhile, finely chop the bell pepper (about 1/2 cup) and transfer it to a medium bowl. Trim and thinly slice the scallions (a heaping 1/3 cup) and peel and Microplane-grate the ginger (about 1 tablespoon); transfer each to the bowl with the bell pepper as it is prepared. Press the garlic (about 1 teaspoon) into the bowl.
  4. Drain, rinse, and thoroughly dry the cabbage; add it to the bell pepper mixture along with the vinegar mixture and stir until thoroughly combined. Pack the kimchi into a nonreactive bowl or jar, cover, refrigerate until you are ready to use it. Kimchi will keep in the refrigerator for about 1 week.

I use apple cider vinegar in making Korean Kimchi. It’s good — I like all of these pickled veggies, no cooking oil, no fat, just fresh vegetables. I made Kimchi with julienned carrots (as a sub for the red bell pepper). First I salted the Napa cabbage in a big pot and put a heavy plate on it, with added weights on it, so it will sweat more water out of it — for 4 hours or longer is fine. Also I used store-bought Kimchi first: after I finished the jar, then I could used the leftover sour juice for starter, as a shortcut. It came out pretty good! No need to spend big money to buy it packaged every time. I don’t eat Kimchi often, but once a while with my homemade fried rice, it’s a good combination in taste.
~Kai-ling

A side of kimchi with pork fried rice

P.S. Also I have heard that Kimchi and sauerkraut are good fermented foods: “Sauerkraut is essentially fermented cabbage… During the fermentation process, beneficial probiotics, or ‘live bacteria’ are produced, and these probiotics are what give sauerkraut most of its health benefits. Sauerkraut is a good form of dietary fibre and contains vitamins C and K, potassium, calcium and phosphorus.” (BBC Good Food)

How to pan-fry frozen dumplings

IMG_20180327_194010.jpg

With frozen dumplings, either prepared or homemade, you can boil the dumplings by 1) adding the dumplings to the pot, waiting for the water to re-simmer, adding a cup of water, wait to re-simmer, repeat again with another cup of water, then serve immediately as they float to the surface.

But the tastier version is to fry-steam them. Following Amber’s methods, pour some vegetable oil in a non-stick pan, coating the bottom thinly. Add your dumplings (I usually eat seven at a time) and allow them to fry over medium heat until golden brown on the bottom. Get your lid ready. Add a couple spoonfuls of water per dumplings, or enough to cover the bottom of the pan, and cover immediately, as splattering will commence. Steam them until most of the water is gone, which you will be able to hear. Serve immediately with dipping sauce.

Shou-wen’s Dipping Sauce
For the dipping sauce, I chop some garlic, boil some peanut oil until sizzling, then add the garlic to the oil. Pour the sizzling garlic oil on some dry chilli powder. Serve.

My dipping sauce
Slice thin some ginger, add some sesame oil, sliced scallions, and enough soy sauce.

~Jessica

Stir-fried cabbage, Chinese style

imag0899Adapted from The Woks of Life

vegetable oil
a bit of pork belly (optional)
5 cloves garlic, smashed and cut in half
5 dried red chilies, deseeded and very roughly chopped
1/2 head of cabbage, sliced for slaw
Shaoxing wine, soy sauce, sugar, water, Chinese black vinegar (didn’t have this one)
2 scallions, cut into 2-inch lengths

Heat oil and sear meat, if including. Add garlic and chilies, cook until fragrant. Add the cabbage and sauce ingredients. Cook until softened and cabbage edges are searing. Stir in the scallions and a pinch of salt.

~Jessica

Colcannon

imag0898Adapted from Simply Recipes

Ingredients:

  • 2 potatoes, peeled and cut into large chunks
  • Salt
  • 30 g unsalted butter (with more butter for serving)
  • 180 g of chopped cabbage (or kale or other leafy green)
  • 3 green onions, minced
  • 120 mL milk or cream

Directions:

  1. Boil potatoes 15-20 minutes in salted water.
  2. Saute cabbage in butter until browning a bit.
  3. Add scallions and cook for a minute.
  4. Pour in the milk/cream, mix well, add potatoes and mash together.
  5. Add salt and butter to taste. Serve.

~Jessica

Chinese wonton soup

Here’s a recipe not quite similar to the dumplings we did for Lunar New Year. Adapted from LMU München and The Woks of Life. Serves 4

300 g ground pork
200 g bok choy (I used Napa cabbage)
5 scallions, sliced thin
1 slice of ginger, finely grated
15 mL light soy sauce
3 g sesame oil
2 splashes of shaoxing wine
tiny bit of sugar
ground white pepper
500 g wonton wrappers (mine was frozen)
a bit of cornstarch
1.5 L+ of chicken ginger stock (I used legume-vegetable, not as good!)

Mix scallions with the pork, salt, soy sauce and sesame oil. Stir the mixture for a minute. Put teaspoon of filling in the center of the wrapper (“less is more” or they might burst), moisten edges with a little cornstarch slurry (1 part cornstarch : 2 parts water). Fold into a rectangle, sealing all the edges. Or you can fold it into a flower bud or nun’s cap.

Boil the stock, add wontons slowly, and stir occasionally so they don’t stick. After all the wontons float to the surface, cook an extra minute. Drain and serve in a hot chicken broth. Top with chopped cilantro and season with white pepper and sesame oil, if you like. I like to add bok choy, although it wasn’t in season so I only had a bit of Napa cabbage this time, a là Woks of Life’s simplified recipe.

IMAG4865

Steamed shaomai for appetizers!

shāomài (燒賣) is a type of traditional Chinese dumpling served as dim sum.

~Jessica